Month: February 2022

Interview
DevelopmentInsights

Exit Interviews to Reduce Employee Turnover and the Role of Leadership

1 in 4 people quit their job in 2021. The number continues to grow and is not likely to subside this year.1 As the “Great Resignation” upsets companies across every industry, employers are searching for ways to reduce employee turnover.

The interest in turnover is more relevant than ever. Unemployment levels and job openings returned to pre-pandemic levels. Losing trained workers requires the organization to invest significant time and money to recruit, interview, train, and onboard new hires. Turnover disrupts an organization because it requires managers, peers, and human resources to divert resources and takes time away from the organization’s primary service goals.

As the pandemic played a huge role in upheaval, more workers now cite on exit interviews the desire to stay working remotely as a reason to resign. The contrast is universal. Many worked increasingly long hours at home. At the same time, higher numbers than ever claim less work-life balance as a result of being “always-on”. The lack of opportunity and growth many employees experienced contributes to the mass exodus from current employers. Whatever their specific reason for leaving, workers are confident enough in their job prospects to try something new. What more than 50% don’t want to change, is going into the office.

How has workplace culture changed today?

The days when managers simply “command and control” employees are gone. Organizations have changed. Employees bring different needs, wants, and expectations than just two years ago. As people rethink what work means to them and how they are valued, how they spend their time has greater consequences. There are not enough people to replace the retirees that permanently left the workforce. The common goal for any company today is to retain the valued employees they have. Managers, even unknowingly, can create an environment that cultivates or hinders employee morale, undermining the investment HR or leadership makes in benefits, reward programs, and training.

Managers are hired for both their subject matter expertise and also their “soft skills”. As stressors rose for them as well, some were not able to translate those valuable assets into managerial communication or employee motivation.  A study by Life Meets Work found that 56% of American workers claim their boss is “mildly” or “highly toxic”.2 The staff enduring high-stress situations can suffer from emotional exhaustion and recurring anxiety, significantly decreasing performance, creativity, and problem-solving. With strong exit interview reports that compare and contrast microculture experiences, disconnects are clearer to see. A microculture is a mix of demographic and organizational aspects that form a unique cultural envelope for a given population. A single company can have dozens of unique experiences that exit interview analysis reveals.

For example, when employees feel supported at work, they are more likely to indicate a highly fair work environment. According to Gartner, creating a better employee experience will be the most important initiative for HR executives in 2022. “To do this, organizations need to go beyond policies and develop philosophies.” (Brian Kropp, Chief Researcher) One of the challenges is not knowing if these manager breakdowns exist, or where they are most prevalent. Organizations that conduct exit interviews with meaningful exit interview questions about direct supervisors, can unlock hidden insights.

Exit interview
Schematic representation of the procedure of the exit interview

Consider…How well do existing employees trust their manager?

How do those same employees feel about your “employer being a good place to work”?

The negative correlation is high. Employees that don’t trust their manager are less likely to promote that employer to others.

What manager insights are built by conducting exit interviews?

 Why do so many great employees leave their job?

Only 27% of those who say they have “good managers” are thinking about quitting in the next 12 months, versus 63% of employees who have a “bad manager”. Manager relationships can more than double the intention to leave.

So, the best exit interview questions include and inform specific manager actions and unearth areas for which an underperforming manager can see gaps to develop. Most helpful on an exit interview template include:

  •  Accessibility
  • Fairness and equality
  • Trust
  • Respect / Appreciation
  • Nature of feedback
  • An inclination for career development

The role of supervisors is key to an employee’s job experience. They control the degree of structure and potential conflict in the work itself. Managers provide informal and formal feedback to staff on their work behavior and control rewards and even the job security that the employee may enjoy. All these parts of the job experience are particularly important to employees who are trying to adjust themselves in a volatile environment.

Millennial employees are especially less tolerant of mismanagement. Those who feel stifled by their manager are far more likely to quit. They desire an environment that allows them to grow, accept, and use their ideas. Millennials desire greater freedom and trust, and consistently quit jobs when they don’t feel that with their manager.

How can you prevent staff turnover with exit interviews?

What can exit interviews do to slow staff turnover and retain top talent? Those exit interview questions are a crucial step in the offboarding process. An employee’s experience contains valuable information and is the cornerstone of any long-term retention strategy. Good exit interview questions anchor the data that can drive specific changes across:

  • Benefits
  • Compensation
  • Staff Training
  • Recruiting
  • Recognition Programs
  • Manager Coaching

Exit Interview Action Items

Employee turnover triggers a complex chain of events within organizations. When similar exit interview trends are reported across departments, titles, locations, divisions, we have a compelling argument for change. How do the managers of those departments or locations compare?

Learning the precise gaps in management skills allows leadership to fill those gaps with targeted training and support tools. Helping managers to master interpersonal skills gives them the ability to hone their positive influence as well as curb negative impact. Increase the chance that your managers are one of the 27% who is “good managers”.

Author Bio: 

Reka Barna is a Senior Talent Management Associate at Retensa, the world’s leading innovator of employee retention strategies, that provides the tools to predict and prevent breakdowns across the Employee Lifecycle. Her work at Retensa focuses on supporting retention consulting projects on staff turnover, employee engagement strategies, and composing Talent Management research. She is a graduate of Touro College School of Health Sciences, New York, and pursuing her master’s degree in Industrial and Organizational Psychology. 

References:

  1. Viser. (2021). Outsmart. Retrieved from Four Things We Learned About the Resignation Wave- and what to Do Next: https://www.visier.com/blog/trends/four-things-we-learned-about-the-resignation-wave-and-what-to-do-next/
  2.  Abbajay, M. (2018, September 7). Harvard Business Review. What to Do When You Have a Bad Boss: https://hbr.org/2018/09/what-to-do-when-you-have-a-bad-boss
  3. Retensa. (n.d.). Blog. Avoiding Managerial Dysfunction in your Workplace: https://retensa.com/blog/avoiding-managerial-dysfunction-in-your-workplace/

Everett Spain and Boris Groyberg ( 2016, April) Harvard Business Review. Making Exit Interviews Count: https://hbr.org/2016/04/making-exit-interviews-count

Laptop
SaaS

How to Become a Pro at Web Designing? All the Dos and Don’ts

What’s the first thing that you notice on a website? Is it the design or the layout? Or are you more interested in how user-friendly the interface is? Priorities of a web design vary according to designers’ preferences. However, there are certain elements that every designer should take care of. Your top priority should be making them fun and enjoyable.

For the newbies in the industry, it can be a bit of a daunting task. If you find yourself lost and aren’t sure what are the dos and don’ts for your web design, you’re in the right place. As the experts of affordable web design services, we have curated a list of all the dos and don’t that will surely help you in your journey as a web designer.

Let’s Talk About the Dos First

1.   Keep the Interface Consistent

One of the primary principles of a good UX is to maintain consistency throughout the design. The overall look across the website pages should be similar rather than being majorly different. Consistency of color schemes, navigation, and writing style will positively impact the UX.

Simply put, consider your consistency a double-edged sword. If it’s not designed properly, the outcome will result in a poor design when you try to make the other parts consistent. So, make sure your design is usable and then move forward with consistency.

2.   Should be Easy-to-Navigate

Easy navigation is the foundation of usability. When your website is easy to navigate, it acts as the primary interaction technique. Without it, the visitors cannot find what they are looking for and will leave disappointed. Try to keep too-level navigation for the essential navigation options and sub-navigation with clear and specific categorization. You should also ensure using clear labels for better navigation and easy words to ensure everyone understands them.

Furthermore, your website should be built in a way that takes the users to the destination with a maximum of three clicks. If it takes them more than that to reach their desired option, you need to make some improvements. Including navigation options in the footer is also a good idea. When people can’t find what they are looking for in the tabs, they turn to the footer. So, make sure it has all the essential labels.

3.   Make Scanning Easy

Truth be told, no one likes to read everything on the website. When someone visits, they expect everything to be right in front of them, and they can find their desired option by quickly scanning through. Your job as a designer is to ensure that everything is clearly visible and the visual hierarchy is top-notch. By visual hierarchy, we mean that elements should be arranged according to their importance, such as where the eyes should focus first, second, third, and so on.

 To make scanning easy, here’s what you need to do:

  1. Avoid text walls – rather than stuffing the page with a lot of text, arrange the information in the form of chunks to make it easier to skim through.
  2. Highlight what’s important – you should put more visual weight on the critical elements. For instance, the call-to-action buttons should stand out, so they catch the visitors’ attention right away. You can use different fonts or colors for highlighting.
  3. Stick to a grid – Scattered information won’t do you any good so, try to make a grid layout. A grid will allow you to organize information and make it look more presentable. It will make it easier for the visitors to get the information and prevent them from getting lost.

4.   Pay Attention to your Content

The design and visual appeal of your website are not everything. Sure, it helps grab the viewer’s attention, but if the content inside is low-quality, there is nothing that will encourage the visitor to stay on your page. So, to give them something to stay for, you need good content. If you want to make your website a good one, both visuals and content are equally important. Make sure that the web design complements the content and fulfills all requirements.

Only add the content that’s relevant to your website. Irrelevant content will only kill your website’s image and confuse your visitors. Every word should be valuable for the visitors and offer the information they are looking for. You should also avoid the use of unnecessarily complicated terms. The website is supposed to be easily understandable by everyone, and using difficult words won’t make it look fancy.

Now We More Towards the Don’ts

1.   Don’t Test Your Visitors’ Patience

 Did you know that 54% of people expect a web page to load within 3 seconds? If it takes longer than that, they’re likely to abandon your website, and that’s something no web designer wants. So, if you want to ensure that your visitors stay on the site, you shouldn’t test their patience. Your web page should load in 2 seconds or less. That’s why high loading speed should be your priority. If you pay attention to the loading time, the chances are that 79% of the people will revisit or even share your website!

2.   Don’t Confuse Internal & External Links 

You might not know this, but visitors expect different behavior from internal and external links. Therefore, you should keep a clear distinction between them both. Your internal links should open on the same page, so the users have the option to use the back button and return to the initial page. Even if you want to direct them to a new tab, add a warning before automatically opening it. The notification can go along the lines of “opens is a new tab.” On the contrary, all external links should open in new tabs so users know that they are now entering a new source.

3.   Don’t Include Too Many Typefaces

 As a beginner, you might find it tempting to use too many typefaces; don’t give in to your temptations. Using five or six different fonts and uploading your own fonts is a rookie mistake. It makes your interface look childish and doesn’t give it the classic appeal that you want. Keep it classy and simple, as too many variations can be distracting and confusing. Look at your website from a viewer’s perspective, and you will agree that significant variations in the typefaces can be borderline annoying.

Summing it Up

Laptop
A man is working on his business laptop

 That being said, your website is your brand’s image. If you fail to satisfy the visitors, they will move on to your competitors, and that’s the last thing you want. So, with every decision, put yourself in the viewer’s shoes and then proceed accordingly. When you ensure offering a delightful experience to your visitors, you will thrive as a web designer.

 

Author Bio:

Sophie Handrix was born in New York & has vast experience in the designing industry. She is working at Adravity.