Smart locks are electronic locks that are connected to smart devices. These locks are typically equipped on external doors, or those that separate the interior of a home from the outdoors. 

In most cases, smart locks are attached to the deadbolts of standard locks, allowing both traditional, physical keys and their electronic, “smart” counterparts to unlock the doors they’re attached to. However, some smart locks are only able to be opened with smart devices. 

Smart locks don’t let just anybody inside. Rather, smartphones, tablets, and computers have to be configured before using smart locks. In most cases, an application or software is downloaded onto a smart device. Logging onto those programs grants access to the smart locks they’re connected to. System administrators – parents, for example – can grant temporary authorization to guests or lower-level users – family members or children, for the example’s sake – as well as permanently add users to their smart locks’ configurations. 

What if the homeowner’s device breaks or is misplaced – can locksmiths gain entry to smart locks? 

Most smart locks are supported by secure, encrypted, Internet-based access platforms. If the only system administrator’s smartphone gets waterlogged and stops working, a locksmith can still pick or drill that lock manually as long as it has a keyhole. 

For the rare few smart locks without keyholes, system administrators can call the customer support line maintained by the device’s manufacturer to temporarily gain access to the smart lock or disable it entirely. Homeowners, renters, and people who are otherwise system administrators of their residences’ smart home networks must prove their identities to these support lines, usually carried out by answering questions that only those people could answer correctly

Posted by Miley Dowling

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